Bullying

Bullying 2018-02-03T17:36:23+01:00

Bullying can happen to anyone. It is always wrong – nobody should hurt you or make you feel bad.

If you are being bullied, it is really important to ask for help. Try to talk to someone you trust, perhaps a friend, a parent or carer or a teacher. Talking can sometimes be difficult so if you find it easier write them a note or email.

If you don’t think you can talk to someone you know, or you think that it might make things worse you can call ChildLine – free helpline for children and young people to talk about any problem, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 0800 1111 www.childline.org.uk

Bullying can mean many different things:

  • being called names
  • being teased or put down
  • being physically hit or kicked or physically hurt,
  • being pushed or pulled about
  • having stuff taken from you
  • having rumours spread about you
  • being ignored or left out
  • being threatened or intimidated
  • being bullied online or through your phone 

Bullying doesn’t have to be by people your own age. It might be an older person. It might be someone you know or a stranger. Whoever they are, nobody has the right to bully you.

There are lots of reasons why people bully. It might be because of skin colour, or about coming from another country. It might be about sexuality or gender or because of a disability.

Whatever the reason, it is never ok and you should find someone to talk to about it.

Asking for help is not a sign of weakness. It is the first step to stopping the situation.

The Childline website has lots of advice about how to deal with bullying. It has tips on building your confidence, about how to block the bully and how to look after yourself.

Visit www.childline.org.uk/info-advice/bullying-abuse-safety/types-bullying/bullying/

If you are being bullied, it is really important to ask for help. Try to talk to someone you trust, perhaps your friends, a parent or carer or a teacher. Talking can sometimes be difficult so if you find it easier write them a note or email.

If you don’t think you can talk to someone you know, or that it might make things worse you can call Childline in confidence. Ring 0800 1111. Childline advisers are trained to help any child or young person. They are also trained not to judge you.

On its website, Childline gives the following advice:

  • Stay away from anyone involved in bullying
  • Stay in a group of friends when you don’t feel safe
  • Walk home with someone or get a lift
  • Ask your mates to look out for you
  • Try not to fight back, as you could get into trouble or get hurt
  • Don’t reply to an abusive message
  • Keep a record and save any nasty messages you’ve received
  • Block the bullying from contacting you or unfriend them on social media
  • Ask your school about its anti-bullying policy to found out what they should do about bullying. The law makes it clear that your school must try to stop all forms of bullying from happening.

  • Childline is a helpline for children to talk about any problems 24 hours a day, 7 days a week – call free on 0800 1111 or visit childline.org.uk/get-support
  • If you are in an emergency and there is a risk to life (yours or someone else’s) call 999
  • To report any concerns about the safety or welfare of a child or young person call 01454 866000

There is more information in the ‘Getting help’ section.

Talk to a parent or carer or another adult you trust.

Your school can also help with your wellbeing – just ask a teacher or another member of staff.

Anti-Bullying Alliance www.anti-bullyingalliance.org.uk/

Bullying UK – Charity campaigning against school bullying, and supporting victims. Includes information about their services, advice sections and resources. www.bullying.co.uk

Bullybusters operates a free anti-bullying helpline for anyone who’s been affected by bullying. It also has a website and message board, with sections specifically for kids and young people. www.bullybusters.org.uk 0800 169 6928.

Kidscape equips young people, parents and professionals with the skills to tackle bullying and
safeguarding issues across the UK. www.kidscape.org.uk/

Reading Well; Shelf Help – a list of recommended books to help young people deal with a range of issues, available in all libraries www.southglos.gov.uk/leisure-and-culture/libraries/recommended-booklist/reading-well-shelf-life/

Bullying related to race, religion or culture – Childline’s website has a section of racism and what you can do if you encounter racist bullying  www.childline.org.uk/info-advice/bullying-abuse-safety/crime-law/racism/

Bullying of young people with a learning disability.  Don’t Stick it, Stop it! set up by Mencap, campaigns against the bullying of young people with learning disabilities. www.mencap.org.uk/advice-and-support/bullying

Cyberbullying – uses technology to bully people. Find out how to deal with cyberbullying  https://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/Bullying/Pages/Cyberbullying.aspx

Young Carers – Babble is an online community for young carers (aged under 18) run by the Carers Trust. You can ask questions and get online advice